Thursday, May 17, 2018

Amy E. Reichert serves up a delicious story...plus a book giveaway

Photo by Kelly Johnsen
Amy E. Reichert is here to celebrate the publication week of her latest novel, The Optimist's Guide to Letting Go. We can't think of a better month to have her here, as all her books focus on food. Her answers to our questions show her love for all things food and cooking related, so we hope you will enjoy learning more about her in this way. Thanks to Gallery, we have TWO copies to give away!

Amy E. Reichert is also the author of THE COINCIDENCE OF COCONUT CAKE, LUCK, LOVE & LEMON PIE, and THE SIMPLICITY OF CIDER, loves to write stories that end well with characters you’d invite to dinner. A wife, mom, amateur chef, Fix-It Mistress, a volunteer baby snuggler, and cider enthusiast, she earned her MA in English Literature and serves on her library’s board of directors. She's a member of Tall Poppy Writers. (Courtesy of Amy's website.)

Visit Amy online:
Website * Facebook * Twitter * Instagram


Synopsis:
Three generations. Seven days. One big secret. The author of The Coincidence of Coconut Cake unfolds a mother-daughter story told by three women whose time to reckon with a life-altering secret is running out.

Gina Zoberski wants to make it through one day without her fastidious mother, Lorraine, cataloguing all her faults, and her sullen teenage daughter, May, snubbing her. Too bad there’s no chance of that. Her relentlessly sunny disposition annoys them both, no matter how hard she tries. Instead, Gina finds order and comfort in obsessive list-making and her work at Grilled G’s, the gourmet grilled cheese food truck built by her late husband.


But when Lorraine suffers a sudden stroke, Gina stumbles upon a family secret Lorraine's kept hidden for forty years. In the face of her mother’s failing health and her daughter’s rebellion, this optimist might find that piecing together the truth is the push she needs to let go... (Courtesy of Amazon.)


What is your go-to recipe?
Tacos. I brown one pound of ground beef, then add in one can of black beans, 1/4 cup of taco seasoning or more as needed (I use Penzey’s), one teaspoon cumin, salt and pepper, and one cup salsa (or more—I make it a little different every time). Simmer for five minutes. Scoop into tortillas, top with your favorite toppings. I use shredded cheese, sour cream, and lettuce. It’s the one meal that makes my entire family happy.

What is your favorite cuisine?
This is a tough one—I like it all. I have favorites in every cuisine, from tom kha soup (a yummy chicken, coconut milk thai soup) to bone marrow on crispy toast to burgers and fries. I do tend to prefer meals that are cooked for ages like cuban pork or a roast beef that’s falling apart on top of mashed potatoes and gravy.

What snack would be a good pairing with The Optimist's Guide to Letting Go?
Grilled cheese and brownies. I’m not responsible for weight gain. That should be a disclaimer on all my books.

What is the strangest thing you have ever eaten?
A pineapple and cheese casserole. It sounds disgusting but it’s surprisingly delicious. Now I want to make it…

What is your favorite holiday that involves a lot of food and favorite recipe for that holiday?
100% Thanksgiving. And my favorite is the stuffing. Our family’s recipe is dead simple: one pound ground pork sausage and one pound ground beef. Brown them, then toss with a pound of seasoned bread cubes, then add homemade turkey stock until the bread cubes soften and start to break down. Place in a casserole dish and heat (or stuff in the bird—but make sure it gets above 170 degrees). I use leftover stuffing for sandwiches and topped on toast (yes, I eat stuffing on toast—it’s scrumptious).

Tell us about a cooking disaster (yours or someone close to you).
There are almost too many to choose. I regularly set off smoke detectors and set things on fire—that’s going to happen when you’re trying new things in the kitchen. One time, I was teaching a friend how to saute salmon. Teaching! I let the oil get too hot, so when I put the salmon in, the spattering oil it caught fire. In a rare moment of calm, I covered the pan with a lid and carried it outside. I failed to teach my friend how to cook salmon, but she did learn how to not panic while putting out an oil fire.

Thanks to Amy for visiting with us and to Gallery for sharing her book with our readers!

How to win: Use Rafflecopter to enter the giveaway. If you have any questions, feel free to contact us. If you have trouble using Rafflecopter on our blog, enter the giveaway here

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Giveaway ends May 23rd at midnight EST.

27 comments:

Janine said...

I really don't eat strange things. But I did try dragon fruit not too long ago. My husband thought it looked weird and refused to try it.

randy oaklief said...

Thanks for a great giveaway!

Storeybooklover said...

French fries dipped in a chocolate shake is one of my favorite "strange" things to eat! ��

kristin tahai said...

When I studied in France, after being a vegetarian for about 10 years, I decided I needed all the comfort foods from home. I had sausages wrapped in croissants, pâté, and other odd things - so while not all too strange, for me, eating a lot of meat over a short period after not eating it for so long was quite strange. After that, I never went back to vegetarianism.

Peggy said...

Nothing really strange but I love fried okra. I can eat it like popcorn. I have a cooking disaster story though. I cooked chicken teriyaki in the oven and then sat the glass dish on a burner that had been on and the glass dish shattered all over everything! After we cleaned up the kitchen we went out for pizza. LOL

Carla S. said...

I tried a lot of strange things during several visits to Japan. I can't honestly say even what they were, but I will usually try anything once.

traveler said...

Certain strange veggies which were not to my liking.

Me said...

Thanks for the great giveaway!

Cori said...

I just finished this fabulous book thanks to NetGalley. 5 stars 🌟. I loved it. Not many authors can incorporate food into the plot as natural as Amy R. does!!

Lynn said...

Like another post, I LOVE fried okra. I grew up in Upstate SC. Fried okra all summer long most of the time served with fresh corn cut off the cob and cooked in frying pan. Thank you for hosting the giveaway. Loved Coconut Cake novel!

Faith Creech said...

Fish head soup, which I will never eat again! Everybody in East Asia loves it and I have no idea why!!

Linda Kish said...

I don't eat a lot of weird things. Octopus might be weird to some people, though.

Kate Vocke said...

I went to Vietnam a few years ago and everything I ate was strange! But delicious! I'd say the weirdest thing was a mung bean "dessert" that had been formed to look exactly like hard boiled eggs.. but it was sweet - and yummy! And we washed it down with Snake Wine!

Mary C said...

fish cheeks

Maria Malaveci said...

Strangest thing I would say is marinated Octopus! Delicious!

Dianne Casey said...

I'm not a very adventurous eater. I've tried calamari and it wasn't my favorite.

AdrianeC said...

I am not an adventurous eater at all...maybe sushi which I didn't like.

dstoutholcomb said...

cheeto-like puffs make from cricket flour

RD said...

Escargot

Arletta Boulton said...

I think the weirdest thing was alligator on a stick at the State Fair.

Lesley McIntosh said...

I don't eat anything out of the ordinary but I do enjoy haggis in Scotland which a lot of people think is weird

Mary Preston said...

I'm a fussy eater so a LOT of things are weird to me.

bn100 said...

nothing odd

Bethany Clark said...

Thanks for the great giveaway! Dying to read this book! :)

Susan Schleicher said...

I tried alligator once. It was okay but probably never again. The fried batter made it edible.

rubynreba said...

Rocky Mountain Oysters!

Kimberly S said...

I usually try to stay away from strange food. I've had calamari before so that's as strange as I get. Someone made squirrel once, I just couldn't bring myself to eat it.