Monday, August 24, 2015

Spotlight and Giveaway: The Legacy of Us

Liz Moretti thought she knew almost everything about her grandmother, Ella, from her love of The Golden Girls to the perfect pound cake recipe. But when Ella passes away and Liz finds a cameo locket with a marriage proposal engraved inside (from a man who was not her grandfather), she realizes that sometimes a person's secrets are discovered only after they're gone.

On top of losing Ella, Liz's career as a jewelry designer is stagnant and her love life lacks sparkle, too. When she reconnects with the one who got away, Liz thinks maybe things are finally starting to look up. But after a few drinks and a trip down a flight of stairs, Liz wakes up to realize the cameo is gone. Her ex offers to look for it, but so does Justin, the intriguing new guy in her apartment building.

While dealing with her feelings for two very different men and generally trying to reinvent her mess of a life, Liz finds answers and solace in Ella's diary. The story of the cameo, and the relationship between her grandmother and great-grandmother, an outspoken socialite from Italy, inspires Liz to grow up and accept responsibility for her missteps. Eventually she must choose between the life she thought she wanted and the promise of something better.



Kristin Contino grew up in a world of writing and reading, which evolved into a career as a freelance writer, editor and women’s fiction reviewer. Kristin enjoys spending time with her family and loves travel, photography and dreams of moving to her favorite city, London. The Legacy of Us is her debut novel. Visit Kristin at her website, Facebook, and Twitter.

Thanks to BookSparks, we have one copy to share with a lucky US reader!

How to win: Use Rafflecopter to enter the giveaway. If you have any questions, feel free to contact us. If you have trouble using Rafflecopter on our blog, enter the giveaway here.


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US only. Giveaway ends August 30th at midnight EST.

17 comments:

Jennifer said...

My grandmother had a 3 year old with twins on the way when my grandfather was in Germany on the front line during WWII. She worked up until her due date, had twins naturally, and went home and took care of everyone all by herself. Then when my grandfather was injured in the war, she drove everyone several states away to visit him, all on her own. He was in the hospital for over a year. I wish I had an ounce of her strength! :)

Bonnie Franks said...

My grandmother went to college when girls didn't go to college. She was an only child and close to her parents and loved to read. She married when she was nineteen and moved away with her husband whose job it was to take care of and manage a large farm. She gave birth to four children and was still as in love as the day she married. Both she and her husband contracted pneumonia one winter when the children were still very young, and my grandfather died. She was so ill she was unable to leave her bed to go home and bury him. She did recover and went home, where she became a widow woman with young children and a job....again unheard of in her day. When she talked about the love of her life to me many years later, the light still shone in her eyes. What a tragedy for her.

Janine said...

I would love to know more about their lives before coming to America.

Suburban prep said...

I do not remember 2 of my grandparents that well. They passed when I was very young. I would just like to know about their lives.

Anonymous said...

If I Grandparents were still alive, I would like to ask them how life was living in a foreign country when they were growing up. My Grandmother was from Russia & my Grandfather was from Poland. Linda May

Linda Kish said...

My maternal grandparents were born in the 1880s and my grandfather was born in Norway. I would love to know what growing up in Norway was like and emigrating to the US when he was in his teens. He died when I was very young. I really don't remember him except from pictures and stories. My grandmother died in 1974 at 92.

Jessica Meddick said...

I wish I could just ask them general questions about their lives. I knew my grandparents when I was younger and I would like to ask them questions as an adult now.

Bonnie K. said...

Being very private, I don't know if my grandfather would answer my question. I would like to ask him if he ever regretted giving up a lucrative job to move his family back to a small community and move into my grandmother's family home (this was due to my grandmother not liking the big city). He took a considerable pay cut. From what I've seen, I think he was happy with his decision. They had an acre and he grew lots of vegetables and fruits. He was a small town boy, too, so he knew how to be frugal and work hard.

bluedawn95864 at gmail dot com

Susan Roberts said...

My grandmother was a school teacher in one room school houses while she was raising their 7 kids. I'd like to ask her how she got everything done and what her typical days were like. I knew my grandparents - and several of my great grandparents - as a child but you don't think to ask questions about their younger days when you are young.

rhonda said...

Found out my great uncle was a renowned photographer,

Cher B said...

I grew up loving my great-aunts and uncles, but two of my grandparents had passed and two were estranged, sadly. I would love to hear stories about my parents' childhoods and also love to hear what my mother's mother really thought of my father. I know there would be a colorful story there.
The book sounds lovely. Thanks for the chance to win!
cherbasonATgmailDOTcom

holdenj said...

One of my grandmothers was widowed during the Depression. I would love to be able to ask her about how they made it through those difficult years.

susieqlaw said...

My grandpa drove all the way to Detroit when he was 12!

Anita Yancey said...

I don't know much about my grandparents because they all passed away when I was very young. But I wish I could ask my mom's parents what my mom was like growing up.

bn100 said...

maybe how they grew up

Grandma Cootie said...

My grandmother did not drive, and we just thought it was because she was "old" or didn't want to. We tried hard not to laugh out loud when we found out that the one and only time she tried to drive the "gearshift" was actually pedals on the floor. She got in the car, stomped on the pedal, and drove backwards into a wall. Never drove again.

Margie said...

My grandparents have passed away. I have some old photo albums I wish I could ask them about, who certain people are, etc.